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Image credit   As our economy slowly recovered from the pandemic, and more job seekers have found jobs all over the world, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has predicted that the unemployment rate will be rising this 2024. Growing inequalities and stagnant productivity are causes for concern, according to the ILO’s World Employment and social Outlook trends 2024 report. There are only about 5 percent of the...
Image credit   The past three years have been pretty tough for the health industry. The burnout our healthcare professionals feel is still looming up until today and the shortage continues to trend in the whole country. This poses a great deal of challenge for the recruitment and forces new innovative ways to fill in open roles and positions. Mental Health needs will continue to be a demand for employees. Applicants will...
Image credit   There has been a severe shortage of nurses in the USA since 2012, and it worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. The American Hospital Association has estimated that they need to hire 200,000 nurses a year to meet the rising demand. There are a lot of reasons for this shortage, some of them are being burned out from work because of being overworked and this is one of the main reasons that nurses leave their...
Photo credit   In 2023, there are still remaining trends that came off from the whirlwind of changes in the landscape of the workforce in the past years. Experts have gathered what remains to be still the demand of the majority of workers and that have employers may need to continue to be cognizant of them: Schedule flexibility – a high number of nurses who have been in contracts would opt to be in a permanent...
Photo credit   We are all motivated by nature. And with this character embedded in our systems, most of us may be prompted into having more jobs than the usual person to cope up with our bills. These side jobs are called “Side Hustle”. Most of our healthcare professionals tend to have one or more of them. Though side hustles add to a person’s busyness, they can also make life more fulfilling for them, help...
Photo credit   Nursing shortage is not new. In the past, we. had experienced these shortages already. However, what differentiates the current situation is that the shortage is happening at a time when the demand is high due to the aging population and Covid-19 pandemic. There are also less enrollees to nursing to help ensure that the pipeline for healthcare workers is healthy. Previously, the organizations had made extreme...
Photo credit   After the COVID-19 pandemic has slowly subsided, the healthcare employment still continues to grow at a moderate pace, mostly in ambulatory care settings last may this year. This finding is based on monthly seasonally adjusted data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. In April this year, the healthcare facilities added 34,000 jobs and had 28,000 openings for ambulatory care based on the report compared to the...